Allspice

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Code: f339
Latin name: Pimenta dioica
Source material: Dried unripe allspice berries
Family: Myrtaceae
Synonyms: Pimenta officinalis
 
Allspice is a highly aromatic spice.

Allergen Exposure

Dried unripe berries from a tropical evergreen tree of the myrtle family (Myrtaceae) are the source of the highly aromatic spice allspice. Ground allspice, or the whole berry, is widely used in a variety of food products, such as pickles, ketchup, seafood seasoning, curry powder, formulations for sausages, pickled meats and fish products, in sweet goods baking, puddings and fruit preparations. Allspice is also used in herbal therapies and as a perfume for soaps. Hot allspice tea has been used for colds, menstrual cramps and upset stomachs. Allspice oil contains the chemical eugenol, which may be used to promote digestive enzyme activity and as a pain reliever. Dentists sometimes use eugenol as a local anesthetic for teeth and gums.

Potential Cross-Reactivity

To other members of the family such as Eucalyptus (gum tree), Zyzygium (clove), Melaleuca (cajeput tree), and Psidium (guava).

Clinical Experience

No information available.
 
Review
Dried unripe berries from a tropical evergreen tree of the myrtle family (Myrtaceae) are the source of the highly aromatic spice allspice. Pimenta dioica is an evergreen tree that reaches about 10 metres high, with thin oblong-elliptic, leathery leaves. Small, white flowers grow in about 10 cm wide panicles in spring and summer, followed by dark berries with a diameter of about 5 mm. The tree is native to the West Indies and Central America and is extensively cultivated in Jamaica and Cuba. Allspice was so named because the flavour of the dried berry resembles a combination of cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Early Spanish explorers, mistaking it for a type of pepper, called it pimenta, hence its botanical name and such terms as pimento and Jamaica pepper.
 
Ground allspice, or the whole berry, is widely used in a variety of food products, such as pickles, ketchup, seafood seasoning, curry powder, formulations for sausages, pickled meats and fish products, in sweet goods baking, puddings and fruit preparations. Allspice is also occasionally used as a perfume for soaps and in "alternative medicine". Hot allspice tea has been used for colds, menstrual cramps and upset stomachs. Allspice oil contains the chemical eugenol which may be used to promote digestive enzyme activity and as a pain reliever. Dentists sometimes use eugenol as a local anesthetic for teeth and gums. 
 
Other members of the family are Eucalyptus (gum tree), Euphenia (clove), Melaleuca (cajeput tree), and Psidium (guava).

As in all diagnostic testing, the diagnosis is made by the physican based on both test results and the patient history.